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Coronavirus and bereavement


The complication and implications of a coronavirus bereavement

These are unprecedented times. There’s no roadmap. We’re facing conversations that we never expected—or wanted—to have.

If someone dies of coronavirus or complications linked to it, a number of things may have happened. You may not have been able to be with that person in the lead up to the death. The death may have happened quickly and you may not have been able to attend a funeral. You may you may question the treatment they were able to have and whether it was because resources were stretched that your loved one died. 

Families are experiencing an avalanche of experiences: unexpected loss; traumatic loss; and social distancing combined with the worry of possible loss of income, security and other loved ones.

Grieving when you are self-isolating

Grief is described as being a lonely experience but at the moment you may now be physically alone because of Government restrictions for coronavirus. This can make the feelings of loneliness and grief more intense. It may be that you are self-isolating with your family and so having to also keep children occupied and support them with their grief and fears at the moment. Friends and family who might otherwise have been able to support you may be preoccupied with their own situation and worries.

To respond to this situation, we are gathering as much information as we can to support you at this time and our bereavement team is available to offer telephone support.

Below are links to information that we hope will help you if you have experienced a Coronavirus-related bereavement.